What is an REU? How is it different from an internship?

Advertisements

4 Responses

  1. “REU’s are probably the best choice for anyone who has any uncertainty about what path to take after leaving TCNJ. While an internship may land you an entry-level job, an REU gives you greater insight into what the graduate student experience is all about.”

    This is not true… REU’s look amazing on resumes, because they are extremely competitive and show you can do research. But as far an internship landing you just an entry level job, thats way off base. First off let me start out by saying an REU will pay you 3,000 dollars to most likely live very far away from home and help some professor out with his research. The key is that an REU does give you exposure to some grad school faculty, which is nice.

    My internship paid me about 10,000 dollars this summer, and I am still working for the company. I wouldn’t be starting out at the bottom per se. Unless you consider a job offer of 55k and full benefits as bottom? This is a huge misconception by our current physics students who don’t realize that their a large number of employers looking for employees who posses physics related skills: programming, doing research, leading teams, solving problems.

    Don’t limit yourself!!! You will not have any trouble getting into grad school from a school like tcnj, believe me,

  2. REU’s are probably the best choice for anyone who has any uncertainty about what path to take after leaving TCNJ. While an internship may land you an entry-level job, an REU gives you greater insight into what the graduate student experience is all about. As for me, the REU I did at University of Rochester helped me realize that grad school was the right path for me, and that I certainly do not want to continue doing research in computational theoretical astrophysics like I did last summer. Also, from what I’ve heard from other people, the research groups that conduct REU programs are typically more accepting of new people than internships with big companies (where they may consider you a bother, as was the case of one of my friends who worked for Merck in biology).

  3. Also, REU students generally work directly with graduate students, post docs, and faculty members on actual research. So, while an internship at a company might involve something only tangentially related to the company’s mission, an REU can be a good dry run for what it would be like to be a grad student.

  4. Well, as a starting note, the words “REU” (Research Experience for Undergraduates) and “internship” get thrown around a lot and can often be interchanged. Usually, an internship is through a company, while an REU is through a University, though it may be in conjunction with another institution, company, or such.

    A few differences:
    – REUs are always paid, internships may not be. REUs get a flat fee for the work, paid internships are usually paid per hour.
    – REUs provide money for transportation and provide a place to live, or a larger amount of money to pay for a dorm/apartment. Internships usually have to be local so the student can “drive to work.”
    – REUs are focused on small student research projects. Internships have the student working in some capacity as a part of the company/institution.
    – REUs usually require some sort of presentation of the summer work and results at the end. Internships usually do not.
    – REUs last 8-10 weeks. Internships can be for any length of time.
    – REUs have many other activities/events through the work days and outside of work to get those involved to ‘bond.’ Internships are normal work days with set hours.

    Alright, that’s what I can think of off the top of my head. Correct me if your experience is different. Otherwise, ask questions or add more!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: